Room by Room | Nursery Organization

Let me start by saying that not everyone’s organizational methods will work for all. We all have different lives, needs, and habits that need to be considered. With that being said, this is what we are starting with and sharing what I’m doing/have learned is what this space is all about!

Before we get started here are some things to note!

You’ll notice that some areas are empty and that we may not have as much in the way of clothing, compared to others. We are leaving the empty spaces, so that as he ages and his needs change we have some options for keeping things tidy.

As for the clothing, we have the basics and know that we may need to (and are planning on having to) buy more clothing once he’s here. We are going back and forth about purchasing clothing because babies don’t keep and grow quickly. Our thought? The less stuff he has, the more chances he’ll have to wear his clothes.

Lastly, if you’re interested in seeing the nursery, I posted the tour over the weekend! Needless to say, we are OBSESSED

Dresser

The dresser, as the picture shows, has 8 drawers that are surprisingly deep. Right now, we have 4 main uses for this dresser. A changing station, changing storage, multi-age clothing storage, and then general storage (bedding, accessories, etc.)

Baby's Dresser

The changing station is, quite clearly, on the top of the dresser and consists of the changing pad, some diapering needs, and 2 “accessories”. The accessories are the white noise machine and a small indoor indoor thermometer. We currently have a basket that is housing all the newborn clothes/pajamas we have. It’s a small stash because I highly doubt he’ll fit into them for very long, if at all, and it doesn’t need a dedicated drawer.

The two top left-hand small drawers house the current diaper size (right now it is a mix of newborn and size 1) and diapering/health needs (creams, wipes, over the counter medications, pacifiers, etc.).

The two right-hand small drawers are housing all his pajamas from 0-6 months and swaddling/light-weight blankets. Having these top drawers separated in this manner will allow for easy access (especially at night) and will keep it the crazy contained (when it eventually gets messier).

I also have a feeling that when we are in his room, these are the things I will tend to be reaching for regularly, so why not have them at the top, close by?!

The next row of drawers holds all of his non-hanging clothes. The left hand drawer holds everything from 0-3 and 3 months–pants, long and short sleeve onesies, socks, and so on.

The right hand drawer has everything from above 3 months through 24 months. The 3-6 months clothing has been separated from the overall pile for easier access.

Eventually, I want to get dividers into the drawers and move on to a no fold system. This will cut down on laundry time for me! Also, who on Earth has time to fold itty-bitty baby shirts, in addition to adult clothing. 

The last row of drawers is divided into bedding and burp cloths. The left hand side holds all the extra sheets for the crib, pack and play, and bassinet, and the heavier blankets. On the right hand side, we have all of his receiving blankets and burp cloths.

Closet

On the top shelf we have all of the boxed items that we do not currently need. This is everything from toys to baby gear.

The left hand side, we have all of the clothes that need to be hung up. Sweaters, winter gear, and nicer onesies. When you move from left to right, you increase in clothing size. Below the clothing is a tub holding all of the diaper bag gear. As he gets older, this tub will hold all of the clothing he’s outgrown.

On the right hand side of the closet, is all of the baby gear, the mobile we still need to hang, and extra hangers. Pretty simple!

On the right hand side of the floor, is our extra diaper and wipe storage. We were BLESSED with getting so many diapers of varying sizes. Everything from newborn to size 2 and wipes galore!

The closet is simple, but I can easily see everything we have and will know what is needed with just a quick peak!

Bookcase

The bookcase, of course, holds his books. On the top shelf are decorative items. A piggy bank, the coordinating season’s book, his name plate, and a pair of shoes. These are items we want displayed, but don’t want him (or the dogs to have access to).

To the bottom shelf, we’ve added a of storage basket to the bottom shelf to hold  toys, stuffed animals…things we don’t mind him getting into when he’s older.

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Side Table

The side table is going to be pretty simple. It is very small and is only meant to be of help while we are feeding/rocking him. The basket underneath holds nursing/feeding aids for me (or whoever ends up feeding him). Everything from nursing pads and burp cloths to snacks and a charging cable for a phone.

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The little light is for those late night feedings, so I can get situated and settled in his room, without blinding him.

Basket Organization

Finally, the empty baskets around his room are awaiting a purpose. Any time I organize, I like to leave blank space and empty storage so that has life happens things can organically have a place and stay tidy.

I have picked up 2 different style baskets and highly recommend snagging these. I waited until they went on sale to grab them at 20% off. They are 2 different sizes, easily collapsible and larger than I was expecting.

Hedgehog (square) | Snake (square) | Raccoon (round) | Fox (round)

Key Take-Aways

  1. Keep it simple! Don’t make it so complicated that you’ll forget where things are or go. If you can quickly explain to someone where an object is, you’ve organized with purpose.
  2. Think through what you use the most. These items go in an area with easy access. I call these areas my “grab and go” section.
  3. Leave empty space! I do this with everything I organize. Leaving the empty space allows for organic tidying and organization. As you live in the space, you’ll notice that you may have forgotten about a category of items or you’ll bring in different items. This empty space looks clean, when it is and is not in use.
  4. Don’t be afraid to change things. If a system or an area isn’t working for you, change it until it does! Don’t stick with something just because it makes sense for someone else–make it make sense for YOU

Let me know how you organized your kid’s space! Have you found a system that works for you or are you tweaking systems until it fits your lifestyle?!

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